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CASE STUDY

Central Coast Council

Working with Water

A Delightful Web Game Teaching Water Management

A promo image for S.W.A.P, a first-person shooter developed by Sydney based Game Development Studio Chaos Theory Games
Working with Water is a turn-based strategy web game helping teach students about developing and maintaining a sustainable water supply system.

The game takes place in the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia, where the need for clean drinking water increases as the community grows, and the player is responsible for building new infrastructures to meet the increased demand. 
An iMac that is showcasing the Working with Water title screen. Working with Water is turn-based strategy web game made by Central Coast Council and Chaos Theory.

We were presented with

The Challenge

The Central Coast Council wanted an informative yet engaging platform to educate their community about water management, replacing an in-person training program in the wake of COVID-19 restrictions.

As part of their Love Water campaign, we were tasked with developing a game to simulate the challenges of water management for the growing population of the Central Coast.

That became

The Solution

Targeting Learning Outcomes

Working with Water draws on inquiry-based learning, it aims to help students develop their problem soving skills and exercise high-order thinking.

Players are presented with Challenges such as drought, or algae blooms that threaten the Central Coast water management system. Players must complete Projects like maintanence, or building infrastructure to overcome the challenges and maintain a sustainable flow of clean drinking water. Each Challenge and Project was targeted at a specific learning outcome.
Ani image of an iMac that is showcasing the Working with Water gameplay. Working with Water is turn-based strategy web game made by Central Coast Council and Chaos Theory.
Screenshot of Working with Water completion summary UI. Working with Water is turn-based strategy web game made by Central Coast Council and Chaos Theory.

Instant Feedback on Performance

Working with Water gameplay spans from the year 2020 through to 2036. At the end of every year, players are presented with a water report that reflects their performance.

Players can assess their ability to overcome the challenges, and have the opportunity to access Central Coast Council resources and compare their in-game water system to the work that the Central Coast Council has done in the real-world.

Realistic Map of Central Coast

In Working with Water, water management infrastructure like dams and weirs, and population centres such as towns are visible and larger than life entities.

This helps the player relate to the local areas that they are familiar with, while still providing clear visibility of key elements.
Screenshot of Working with Water gameplay and in-game map of Central Coast, Australia. Working with Water is turn-based strategy web game made by Central Coast Council and Chaos Theory.

Which led to

The Results

Exciting Educational Game

Working with Water will be an additional teaching resource for science and geography teachers who teach students in stage 3 and 4.
An image of a woman holding a MacBook with the Working with Water title screen. Working with Water is turn-based strategy web game made by Central Coast Council and Chaos Theory.
A photograph of  the Mardi Dam in Mardi, Central Coast NSW Australia

Increased Awareness

Helping to increase awareness about water management, infrastucture, restrictions and Central Coast Council services.

Happy Client

Launched in September 2020, we will update this case study with detailed stats as they become available.
A screenshot of the Central Coast Urban Spatial Plan
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